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Escorts and Sex for the Disabled

Escorts and Sex for the Disabled

If you are an escort, there is no doubt you will receive a few strange requests in your escorting career. Maybe you'll have a client that wants you to dress in drag and spank them with their childhood toy. Maybe you'll even have a client that just wants to cry uncontrollably over the death of their beloved goldfish in your bare breasts. Whatever it may be, you will more than likely try to accommodate their request if it's within your comfort zone.

What most escorts don't plan for are requests from clients with disability. While there is a good chance you will never have this request, what's a girl (or guy) to do if you are asked about sex with someone that’s disabled. The term "disabled clients" could be of any nature: either of a physical disability or a mental disability.

If you are an independent escort, you can decide to accommodate the request or not. You may have family members or close friends of your potential client ask if you provide services to disabled people. If you are unsure, listen to their requests and ask questions of your own so you can both figure out a mutually agreeable arrangement. Whatever you decide is ultimately yours of course, but don’t be mean about it.

If you decide that this is clientele you’d like to cater to and for, then do your research with other escorts, agencies, and brothels. For example, in Brisbane, Australia there are a number of brothels that cater to clientele with disabilities. You can learn from establishments that cater to clients with disabilities and from their sex workers what needs to be done as a whole and on case by case scenarios. Visit sex worker forums, online communities, and so on as other sex workers who have blazed a trail ahead of you can be great fountains of knowledge.

When you advertise and promote yourself as an escort who caters to disabled clientele, you need to be clear about the type of disability you’re willing to accommodate. You also need to be clear about the type of services you are willing to offer your disabled clients. Normally the client or the client's carer would reach out to you with additional questions and that's also a good chance for you to ask your own questions about the potential client. And as mentioned above, if you don't want to take on that client, just be upfront about it but don’t be mean. They're just human beings like you after all.

Most of all, when accepting a client with disability, listen and communicate. They are just like any other client you may have, the only exception is they have a disability that society labels as different.

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